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Tips om sted for å slipe bånd i Oslo


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Erik Welo på Gulden guitars i Drammen er en flink fyr. Han kan gjøre plek-jobb også. Har brukt han til en del jobb på ene bassen min, og er veldig fornøyd. Skikkelig hyggelig er han også :)

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Her er link til hjemmesiden.

Det står ikke pris på alt, men han tar 1900,- for plek, dvs maskin som måler opp bånd/halsprofilen og sliper på 1000dels millimeter. Da er det vel også inkludert sette på strenger, justering av hals, intonasjon og alt sånt som er nødvendig etterpå. Er ikke sikker på timepris hvis han skal gjøre det for hånd, noe som bare aktuelt hvis det kun er noen få eller bare ett bånd som må gjøres noe med siden han nå engang har den plekmaskinen.

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I charge 1400 for a full fret dress, including setup - you provide strings of your choice. Just finishing a dress on an Ibanez S here today actually....smile.gif

Is that plek?

You have your own shop?

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Is that plek?

You have your own shop?

No, not a plek machine, those are absurdly expensive...I dress frets the traditional way by hand, and have been doing so for over 25 years.

Yes, I have a small shop at Kværnerbyen in Oslo. Check the link in my sig for my webpage with info. smile.gif

Edited by AVH Guitar Repair
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Plek may be the most accurate way of dressing frets, but to me there is something missing in the process. Hmm, the human touch, or the craftsmanship of trade. So I would rather have a guitar dressed\tunes by a craftsman, than by a robot.

Not that I have anything negative to say about Gulden Guitars, I bet they also know what they are doing.. But still, you have the service available in Oslo, so why look elsewhere :)

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(i'll keep this in engrish as english speaking ppl have posted here)

I have a Patrick Eggle Vienna from 93 at home. I love the guitar, and the only place when i know it needs work is a the high E on the 14th fret.

However, the guitar beeing from 93, could it use a compleate fret dressing anyway? Is this someting recomended to do on any (almost) 20 year old guitar?

1400 dosnt seem like to much to use on some good treatment for my baby anyhow...

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(i'll keep this in engrish as english speaking ppl have posted here)

I have a Patrick Eggle Vienna from 93 at home. I love the guitar, and the only place when i know it needs work is a the high E on the 14th fret.

However, the guitar beeing from 93, could it use a compleate fret dressing anyway? Is this someting recomended to do on any (almost) 20 year old guitar?

1400 dosnt seem like to much to use on some good treatment for my baby anyhow...

If it's actually just one single fret that is causing a problem, it is possible to re-seat just that fret, but the overall condition of the frets on a guitar of that age and if it needs a full dress can only be determined by a first-hand inspection, which I would be happy to do for you, of course. Contact me at any time, if you like. smile.gif

Fret wear depends on a few factors, most notably amount played, fret size and the often overlooked alloy/composition of the fret wire itself. I've found that like many things these days, fret quality in general has gotten cheaper over the years with softer metal alloys that wear faster, thereby necessitating more frequent fretwork, and more turnaround for fret manufacturers, most notably Dunlop. I've seen and worked on scores of 50's and 60's Gibsons and Fenders with the original frets still intact showing very little wear for it's age by comparison (including my own '58 LP Jr. I've had since 8 yrs old). Better quality alloys back then, just like the old American cars biggrin.gif

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Would one of these first hand inspections be free of charge?

Yes, of course....I could never understand why some people charge just to inspect and tell someone if they need work or not - it only takes me a few minutes with a couple of tools, it's really not a big deal for me. If the guitar winds up needing work, I give a quote and hopefully get the go ahead to start working on it. If the guitar is just fine and needs no work, then the customer is happy to know this and will usually reward honesty with a future return visit when there IS work to be done. smile.gif

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